Adjust the brakes on any bicycle is a tedious process only sped up by experience.  We will go over several steps that can help improve that process for you and get you riding quicker.

  1. Ensure the caliper mount bolts are tight.  There are 4 bolts that hold the caliper onto the bike. 2 that bolt the caliper mount to the frame, and 2 that bolt the caliper to the mount.  Ensure that the two that mount to the frame are reasonably tight.  You dont have to go crazy and crack the paint.  Brake mount bolts
  2. Sight through the top of the brake caliper to check for rotor clearance.  You cant look through the center of the caliper, it has to be from the top on the front brake, and the top back on the rear.  We are trying to identify how the caliper is orientated in regards to the rotor.
  3. Try loosening the caliper to mount arm bolts 1 turn, and adjusting the caliper in regards to the rotor.  If the caliper wont move, loosen a bit more.  You are looking to barely be able to move the caliper, not to be totally free floating.
  4. When you adjust the caliper, aim to have equal clearance between the pad and rotor on both sides.  Tighten the caliper 1/4 a turn while trying to maintain the adjustment.  We try to keep the brakes simple without concave washers for a firm mount that shouldnt come out of adjustment under use.
  5. If you find that you can get some clearance on both sides, but the pad is not parallel to the rotor, you can bend the caliper mount arm to adjust the angle of the pads.
  6. To bend the caliper mount we place a crescent wrench on the black portion below the brake itself.  Using the crescent we tweak the arm slightly, just enough to get the pads more parallel to the rotor.
  7. Continue to adjust the caliper until you have an even gap on both sides between the pads.
  8. On Tektro hydraulic brakes there is no manual adjustment of the pads. You can adjust the lever throw at the lever itself, it is a small 1.5mm allen that is from the inside of the lever to the plunger.
I wanted to put some things together about our eBikes, systems and batteries.  This will be just about batteries.
Currently, almost every battery unit we sell uses LG Chem 18650 cells.  We did for a time have Samsung 35e cells, but have not used those in some time.  We are trying to get a better battery case, where the mount works well on our bikes, but also provides a USB port for running devices.  Our first group of batteries we had with these specs worked well, but as the installer I wasnt happy with the mount. I had to modify it far too much for a simple easy installation.

On charging:

Two trains of thought, one is to plug it in, and let it charge until the light on the charger unit goes to green.  About 5 hours on full discharge. The theory is that the charger only puts out 54.6 volts, so it cant overcharge.
The other train of thought is to purchase a light timer, like what is used for Christmas lights. I have used one of the $9 versions from Home Depot where you pull pins for when the lights come on.  Hook up the charger to it, and program it to charge for 2 hours, rest 1 hour, charge 2. This up down cycle puts less charging strain on the battery, and could potentially lengthen the total life of the battery.

Charge Cycles

The batteries are rated for 600 or more charge cycles.  That is defined to be full discharge to full charged state.  The batteries have a similar life cycle as a cell phone battery has. If you look up LG cell phone battery deterioration   you can get an idea how most lithium ion based batteries perform.

Heat

Heat is a major factor in both the motor and the battery.  We recommend during hot times of the year to charge the battery in a cool place.  Since we are based in the Arizona desert, we see 120 degree and above garage temperatures, and know that is beyond the safe limits of the battery and charger.